What we’ve done • Where we did it • Where we’re doing it now

 
 

DESTINATIONS

Most recent

 

ANTIGUA & BARBUDA

St. John’s

A Glimpse of the Island’s Past at Betty’s Hope One of the island’s earliest sugar plantations recalls slavery era
 

ANTIGUA & BARBUDA

St. John’s

 
 

FRANCE

Paris

 
 

FRENCH POLYNESIA

Papeete

 
 

ITALY

Venice

 
 

ENGLAND

Mottingham

 
 

GUIDE LIGHTS

Tips from the smartest guidebooks

 

PORTUGAL

Évora

 

Among the Megaliths

Lonely Planet Portugal, 10th edition

MEGALITHS dot the European Atlantic coast, but Portugal’s Alentejo region, says the 10th edition of Lonely Planet Portugal, has “an astounding amount.” Some of the slab-stone structures, built 5,000 to 7,500 years ago, were tombs or temples; giant standing stones were probably used for fertility rites or to help with astronomic calculations.

The guidebook especially recommends the area around Évora (pop. 49,000), 134 kilometres east of Lisbon and “one of Portugal’s most beautifully preserved medieval towns” with winding lanes inside 14th-century walls. As for the megaliths outside of town, these are “spiritual, historical, incredible” and “will make your hair stand on end.” To further heighten the effect, “you often have these sites to yourself.” The guidebook suggests buying Paisagens Arqueologicas A Oeste de Évora (it has English summaries) at the Évora tourist office. Ebora Megalithica (www.eboramegalithica.com) has a three-hour tour led by “young archaeologist Mário [who] makes the megalithic sites accessible in every sense.”

At Reguengos de Monsaraz (pop. 7,300), 39 kilometres southeast of Évora, the tourist office has a map outlining the region’s megalithic circuit, which includes the Cromeleque do Xerez, a grouping “with the triumphant 7-tonne menhir [phallic standing stone] at its centre.”

Castelo de Vide (pop. 2,400), 120 kilometres northeast of Évora and “one of Portugal’s most attractive and underrated villages,” has dozens more megaliths, including the seven-metre-high Menhir da Meada, 13 kilometres north of town. “This is supposedly the tallest menhir in the Iberian Peninsula—a large phallus for keeping the fields fertile.”

 

www.lonelyplanet.com

 

ARGENTINA

Buenos Aires

 

NAMIBIA

Tsumkwe

 

UNITED STATES

Seattle, WA

 

SCOTLAND

Stirling

   

RSS logo

Culture Locker
CL chest
The Archives

172 stories from around the world

Most Enjoyed

Guide Lights
GL bookshelf
The Library

Recommendations from 245 of the latest guidebooks